Student doctor lists the signs someone that seems happy is struggling with depression

Student doctor lists the signs someone that seems happy is struggling with depression

The student doctor lists the red flags a “happy” person may have against depression – and the phrases you should NEVER say to those in trouble

  • A student doctor listed the five signs someone has highly functional depression
  • This includes if you feel like you are faking it or feeling sick taking a break
  • Zachery Dereniowski also shared what to and shouldn’t tell someone
  • You shouldn’t say, “keep calm and carry on” and “get over it” to someone
  • Instead, you could say “I hear you” or “Let’s talk about it” to help them

One student doctor listed the five signs that someone who appears to be happy is struggling with “highly functional depression” and pointed out why this is far more common than you might think.

Zachery Dereniowski, 27, is a Canadian motivational speaker and medical student at the University of Sydney. He specializes in mental health and makes TikTok educational videos on the subject.

In one of his latest clips, Zachery revealed why signals like “feeling like you’re faking it” and “being physically ill when you take a break” can be signs that you or someone you know is depressed.

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A student doctor listed the five signs that someone who seems happy is struggling with “highly functional depression” (Zachery Dereniowski in the picture).

Zachery Dereniowski (pictured), 27, is a Canadian motivational speaker and medical student at the University of Sydney. He specializes in mental health

Zachery Dereniowski (pictured), 27, is a Canadian motivational speaker and medical student at the University of Sydney. He specializes in mental health

What are the five signs of highly functional depression?

1. You can meet your obligations but collapse from exhaustion.

2. You feel like you are constantly faking it.

3. You feel physically ill when you take a break.

4. You can fight negative intrusive thoughts while supporting your loved ones.

5. You can do essential things to a high standard but neglect other things entirely.

Source: Tick ​​tock

“The five signs of highly functional depression are that you can keep up with your responsibilities but collapse from exhaustion,” Zachery said in a video.

‘[If you feel like] you keep faking it, you might fight too. ‘

Other signs include someone who is able to combat negative intrusive thoughts while supporting loved ones at the same time.

If you feel physically ill during a break, it can also lead to highly functional depression.

The fifth sign is someone who “can do essential things at a high level but totally neglect other things”.

“Your life is important to anyone reading this,” Zachery said.

‘No one can replace you. I am grateful that you were born. ‘

Thousands of people who watched the medical student’s video were grateful that Zachery shared his opinion on the matter.

“It is so exhausting to be ‘on’ so much,” wrote one person.

“I don’t even know who I am, what people expect, or the girl who can’t get up.”

Another added, “Well, just look at how I feel. Someone who goes through the moves and doesn’t remember the last time I felt really alive. ‘

What should you say

1. I hear you.

2. I can’t imagine how difficult it is.

3. I am there for you.

4. Let’s talk about it.

5. I want to understand better so that I can help.

What shouldn’t you say?

1. Everything happens for a reason.

2. Keep calm and move on.

3. What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger.

4. Overcome it.

5. Time heals all wounds.

Zachery (pictured) said you should never say things like

Zachery (pictured) said you should never say things like “everything happens for a reason” or “keep calm and move on” to someone struggling with depression

What are the four steps you can take for someone struggling with depression?

1. Ask: Are you okay?

2. Listen without judgment.

3. Encourage action.

4. Follow up.

Zachery previously revealed why sayings like “Everything happens for a reason” and “Keep Calm and Carry On” are harmful to people struggling with mental health.

“People don’t feel better when they say, ‘What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger’ and ‘everything happens for a reason,’ said Zachery.

Other jokes that fall into this category are “Keep Calm and Carry On,” “Overcome It,” and “Time Heals All Wounds,” said the doctor.

Instead of these phrases, things like “I hear you” and “I can’t even imagine how difficult this is” are helpful for people struggling with mental health.

“Some of the things you can say to someone in pain include, ‘I hear you,’ ‘I can’t even imagine how difficult that is,’ and ‘I’m here for you,’” said Zachery.

Other statements that can be helpful to people are “Let’s talk about it” and “I want to understand better so that I can help,” as he said that this “confirms” their feelings and means that you get involved.

“You don’t have to be an expert to keep the conversation going when someone says they’re not fine,” Zachery told FEMAIL.

“Knowing what to say can help someone feel supported and get appropriate help long before they’re in crisis, which can have a positive impact on their life.”

“You don’t have to be an expert to keep the conversation going when someone says they’re not fine,” Zachery (pictured) told FEMAIL

Anxiety and Depression: The Facts

What Causes Depression?

Research suggests that persistent difficulties – long-term unemployment, living in an abusive or indifferent relationship, long-term isolation or loneliness, persistent work stress – are more likely to lead to depression than recent life stress states. Personal factors such as family history, personality, serious medical conditions, and drug and alcohol use can also play a role.

What are the Signs and Symptoms of Depression?

The signs and symptoms are varied and can include stopping going out, doing nothing at work or school, withdrawing from close family members and friends, relying on alcohol or sedatives, not doing any of the usual pleasurable activities, and not resting can concentrate. Other signs include feeling overwhelmed, guilty, irritable, frustrated, and unconfident.

What is scary?

Some people with anxiety may have a genetic make-up for anxiety, and these conditions can sometimes run through a family. However, if a parent or close relative has fear or any other mental condition, it does not mean that you will automatically develop fear. Research suggests that people with certain personality traits are more likely to be afraid. For example, children who are perfectionists, easily nervous, shy, inhibited, lacking self-esteem or wanting to control everything sometimes develop anxiety in childhood, adolescence or as adults. Anxiety can develop as a result of one or more stressful life events. Common triggers are a change in work, life circumstances, pregnancy or childbirth, family and relationship problems, or severe emotional shock.

What are the signs and symptoms of anxiety?

While each anxiety condition has its own specifics, there are a few common symptoms, including:

Physically: Panic attacks, hot flashes and hot flashes, racing heart, tightness of the chest, rapid breathing, restlessness, or feeling tight, wrapped up and nervous.

Psychologically: excessive fear, worry, disaster, or obsessive thinking.

Behavior: Avoiding situations that make you feel anxious and that could affect your studies, work, or social life.

Source: Beyond blue

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