More than a THIRD of pregnant women are depressed due Covid-19 pandemic

More than a THIRD of pregnant women are depressed due Covid-19 pandemic

Fifth, pregnant and postnatal women suffer from depression due to stress caused by the Covid-19 pandemic

  • 1,123 women were surveyed in the United States between May and August
  • The majority were white women who have graduated and who live with their partner
  • More than a third of the participants (36.4 percent) were depressed
  • One in five (22.7 percent) had anxiety and 10.3 percent had PTSD

Pregnant women and young mothers suffer from more psychological problems than normal due to the increased stress caused by the Covid-19 pandemic.

Questionnaires distributed to 1,123 women in the United States between May and August rated the effects of the coronavirus outbreak on depression, anxiety, and PTSD.

It found that more than a third (36.4 percent) were depressed, compared with 15 to 20 percent before the pandemic

In addition, one in five (22.7 percent) reported “clinically significant” anxiety and 10.3 percent reported symptoms of PTSD.

Due to the increased stress caused by the Covid-19 pandemic (stock), pregnant women and young mothers suffer from more psychological problems than normal.

These numbers are significantly higher than normal because between ten and 20 percent of women usually experience mental health problems during pregnancy.

“We know that the perinatal phase is already a time when women are particularly prone to psychological problems,” said study author Dr. Cindy Liu of Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Massachusetts.

The survey participants, published in the journal Psychiatry Research, were orally recruited and are therefore not representative of the entire population.

More than ninety percent have a degree and live with their partner, while 89.9 percent were white.

The study found that more than a third (36.4 percent) were depressed, one in five (22.7 percent) had a significant form of anxiety, and 10.3 percent reported symptoms above the clinical threshold for PTSD (inventory).

The study found that more than a third (36.4 percent) were depressed, one in five (22.7 percent) had a significant form of anxiety, and 10.3 percent reported symptoms above the clinical threshold for PTSD (inventory).

Most were also wealthy, with 45 percent of participants living in households with incomes greater than $ 150,000.

“People who work from home, are on maternity leave, or simply have the time to complete such a survey are disproportionately white and wealthy,” said Dr. Liu.

“That is a limitation of this work.”

Participants also revealed a history of mental health problems, and the analysis found that those with pre-existing diagnoses were 1.6 to 3.7 times more likely to have clinically significant measurements of the three conditions.

Stress is higher due to Covid and many forms of assistance have been suspended in the US, leaving women nowhere to seek help.

Boys whose mothers are depressed during pregnancy are more likely to be hyperactive and aggressive

According to a study, boys whose mothers were depressed during pregnancy are more likely to be hyperactive and aggressive.

Researchers from Canada also found that children over the age of 18 are more likely to experience depression when their mothers have prenatal depression.

It’s estimated that up to a fifth of women experience symptoms of depression during pregnancy – with the full effects on the fetus unclear, the team said.

Prenatal depression has been linked to behavioral and developmental problems in children, but exactly how it leads to these changes is unclear.

However, according to the researchers, one explanation could lie in weakened brain connections that affect the child’s behavior.

The study found that weakened white matter in the brain was also linked to increased aggression and hyperactivity in male children.

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