Gov. Newsom backtracks and tells Californians to ‘go to the beach’ for their mental health

Gov. Newsom backtracks and tells Californians to ‘go to the beach’ for their mental health

California Governor Gavin Newsom has traced his stance on the beaches, telling residents to pay a mental health visit to the Orange County coast seven months after his closure, with “disturbing” images of crowded people cited.

Newsom tweeted some recommended activities for Californians to safely enjoy amid the pandemic on Thursday and topped its list. He told residents that “mental health is physical health”.

This happened the same day that California surgeon general Dr. Nadine Burke Harris warned of increased rates of domestic violence, depression and substance abuse as people struggle to find ways to cope during the pandemic.

Cases, deaths and hospitalizations are rising, and the state recorded its deadliest day since the virus touched US soil on Thursday.

California holds the record for the most infections of all 50 U.S. states after taking back Texas leadership this week.

California Governor Gavin Newsom has traced his stance on the beaches, telling residents to pay a mental health visit to the Orange County coast seven months after his closure, with “disturbing” images of crowded people cited

Newsom urged Californians to go to the beach and explore the beauty of your neighborhood and California in a post on Twitter on Thursday.

‘Mental health is physical health. It’s so important to stay active and connected now, ”he tweeted.

“Take your household out safely. Discover the Beauty of Your Neighborhood and CA! ‘

He shared recommended activities including: go to the beach, take your kids to a playground, go for a hike, or take your dog for a walk.

“We can get through this,” he added.

However, some of his recommended activities are the same ones he previously railed against during the pandemic.

Back in April, Newsom ordered all Orange County’s beaches to be closed after “disturbing” images showed crowds of residents pouring into the sand, ignoring the state’s stay-at-home orders.

He said the “hard proximity” of the county’s beaches was necessary to smooth the curve after rising temperatures caused the public to soak up the sun.

Newsom tweeted some recommended activities for Californians to safely enjoy amid the pandemic on Thursday and topped its list. He told residents that

Newsom tweeted some recommended activities for Californians to safely enjoy amid the pandemic on Thursday and topped its list. He told residents that “mental health is physical health”.

Photos showed crowds of sun seekers gathering on the beaches and enjoying the heat wave.

At the time, the governor was expected to close all beaches and state parks across California after a leaked memo from the Newsom government to the California Police Chiefs Association surfaced.

But he seemed to be changing course and only closing Orange County’s state and local beaches.

Local officials criticized the plans that the open spaces are essential to the health and well-being of the public – the same argument Newsom seems to have so far.

Similarly, Newsom showed a dramatic turnaround in terms of the importance of children’s playgrounds.

Outdoor playgrounds initially had to be closed due to its regional regulation on staying at home issued last week.

But the news sparked a backlash from parents and lawmakers who claimed they were especially essential for families in urban areas.

Huntington Beach in Orange County in April, just before Newsom ordered all Orange County's beaches to be closed

Huntington Beach in Orange County in April, just before Newsom ordered all Orange County’s beaches to be closed

Huntington Beach in Orange County in April. Newsom ordered the closure after

Huntington Beach in Orange County in April. Newsom ordered the closure after “disturbing” images showed crowds of residents pouring into the sand, ignoring the state’s stay-at-home orders

California authorities tacitly updated the stay-at-home order Wednesday, adding playgrounds to the list of top locations that can stay open to “promote distant health and wellness through exercise,” and Newsom has the people actively encouraged to visit them the next day.

Newsom’s focus on the psychological impact of the pandemic comes the same day the state surgeon general warned of the psychological distress on residents.

Burke Harris warned of an increase in mental health problems, substance abuse and domestic violence caused by pandemic stress.

She urged people to do sports, eat well and seek psychological treatment.

“What we are seeing are increased rates of things like intimate partner violence or increased rates of mental health problems like depression and anxiety, as well as some increased rates of substance abuse,” she said in an interview with KCRA3 Thursday.

“My office just released a report on the effects of stress on health and what we can do to mitigate the effects of toxic stress.

“Some of the things that have been recommended are things like regular exercise, diet, certainly finding mental health care when necessary, and right now this is certainly a good recommendation for anyone who feels they need it . “

According to Burke Harris, children are also exposed to increased stress due to the pandemic, and she advised parents to “put on our own oxygen masks” in order to be able to support their children as well.

“The key, most important to children right now, is knowing that stress can affect both our mental and physical health, but it heals safe stable and nurturing relationships and environments for children,” she said.

California surgeon general Dr. Nadine Burke Harris warned of increased rates of domestic violence, depression and substance abuse as people struggle to find ways to deal with it during the pandemic

California surgeon general Dr. Nadine Burke Harris warned of increased rates of domestic violence, depression and substance abuse as people struggle to find ways to deal with it during the pandemic

“And so that we can do that, I go back to ourselves and reduce our own stress. For us as parents and carers we have to put on our own oxygen masks so that we are there for our children. ‘

According to research by the CDC, mental health problems, particularly among young adults, have increased during the pandemic.

At the end of June, 40 percent of American adults said they were struggling with mental health problems or drug problems.

The surgeon general spoke as Greater Sacramento dived into a stay-at-home arrangement Thursday evening after ICU capacity in the area fell below 15 percent.

She told KCRA3 the restriction was necessary to “save lives” and ensure there are enough beds for both COVID and non-COVID patients.

“It’s really saving lives,” she said. “We recognize that we need this ability to ensure that not only our patients with COVID-19 but also in the event that any of us are in a car accident or have a heart attack, a bed for Available to our friend or loved one who would be in this situation. ‘

She warned: “Right now we are seeing record numbers of COVID-19 cases across the state.

“Eating in restaurants or going to a nail salon is just a lot more dangerous now than it was a few months ago, simply because there are so many more people in our population now who have COVID-19, and many people may not even be aware of them that they still have it. ‘

On Thursday, California recorded its deadliest day since the pandemic began. 220 people died from the virus.

This exceeded the previous record of 219 on July 31 and increased it by 1.1 percent the day before.

A staggering 12,477 patients are currently being hospitalized nationwide, an increase from 512 patients in a single day.

Of these, 2,170 were in intensive care, 83 more than the day before.

California hospitals are starting to buckle under the pressure as the state of nearly 40 million people has only 1,487 beds available in the intensive care unit.

The state’s 14-day positivity rate rose 2.9 percent in just two weeks, reaching 9 percent on Thursday. Another 29,677 cases were reported.

Concern grows that the worst is yet to come as the cases that lead to hospitalizations and deaths are delayed and the nation waits for the surge to occur after Thanksgiving.

As early as mid-July, before the state hit its previous record number of deaths of 219 on July 31, the daily number of cases was around 13,000. Cases are now more than twice as many.

Last Thursday, Newsom placed a new home stay order for regions in California where less than 15 percent of ICU beds are available.

The new order divided the state into five regions – Northern California, San Joaquin Valley, Greater Sacramento, Southern California, and the Bay Area

If a region exceeds 85 percent of ICU bed capacity, the state will instruct affected regions to close hair salons and barbershops, limit retail stores to 20 percent, and only allow restaurants to have them take away and deliver for at least one three weeks to offer.

The Bay Area threw itself into a lockdown before reaching the threshold on Friday.

Since then, the San Joaquin Valley and Southern California have crossed the threshold, followed by Greater Sacramento Thursday.


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