Paulina Porizkova moves into NYC apartment after sale of $10m house

Paulina Porizkova has returned to New York City and moved into her new apartment after selling the Gramercy Park townhouse that she shared with late husband Ric Ocasek for three decades.

The 55-year-old model, who struggled with depression and anxiety after leaving his long-term home, documented her move-in day on Instagram that day and began with a photo of herself sorting her things in a storage unit.

‘A much happier move-out day. Moving out – from the warehouse! More boxes. But this time I’m happy to be able to unpack! “She put a caption on the picture, which shows her bundled up in a black puffer coat, a knitted hat and a face mask.

Back in the Big Apple: Paulina Porizkova, 55, announced that she has returned to New York City and moved into her new apartment this week

Helping hands: The model pounded a post with the movers she hired to carry her large antiques and baby Grant Piano to her new rental and said it only took two hours

Helping hands: The model pounded a post with the movers she hired to carry her large antiques and baby Grant Piano to her new rental and said it only took two hours

Paulina, who had quarantined most of the pandemic at her New York state home, hired Moishe’s Moving Company to help her move and she had nothing but praise for the team.

She shared a snapshot of herself with the movers in front of her truck while they were all wearing masks.

“This team, led by Alex, moved me in – in two hours, despite my small grand piano and large antique pieces,” she wrote. “Thanks Moishe! And no, this is not an add [sic]I pay like everyone else. Plus tip. ‘

The Sports Illustrated Swimsuit star ended her post with a note about her silver puffer coat that resembled a poncho.

“My crazy silver coat is from Norma Kamali – it’s called a sleeping bag poncho and it really works like one,” she said. ‘Yeah, ok, it looks like it too … But! Super warm! ‘

Paulina also shared a video of herself in her Instagram stories, making instant coffee in her new apartment on the day she moved in.

Celebratory drink: Paulina also shared a video of herself in her Instagram stories as she makes instant coffee in her new apartment on the day she moves in

Celebratory drink: Paulina also shared a video of herself in her Instagram stories as she makes instant coffee in her new apartment on the day she moves in

Celebratory drink: Paulina also shared a video of herself in her Instagram stories as she makes instant coffee in her new apartment on the day she moves in

The mother of two sold her former home for $ 10 million in September, a year after she found her estranged husband dead in the town house at the age of 75 on September 15, 2019.

“Yes, the house that protected us all for thirty years should now embrace another family,” she wrote at the time. “I had a little chat with it when it was shown and told him to woo the kind of people he wanted. Or I would sell it to Russian developers.

‘The house has chosen its next family. And I have to say: it couldn’t have found a better family, ”she added. “The spirit of art and love will stay exactly where it belongs.”

Paulina shared a series of photos of herself packing up the house where she and Ric raised their sons Jonathan, 27 and Oliver, 22, and admitted that she had never cried more than last year.

In late October, she announced that she had struggled with depression and anxiety since moving out.

“This feeling of incredible physical heaviness, lack of energy and constant tears, by the way, is as physical as it is emotional,” she wrote.

Moving on: Paulina sold the townhouse where she lived with her late husband Ric Ocasek for three decades for $ 10 million in September

Moving on: Paulina sold the townhouse where she lived with her late husband Ric Ocasek for three decades for $ 10 million in September

Difficult: Paulina shared a number of photos of herself in which she and Ric raised their sons Jonathan (27) and Oliver (22)

Difficult: Paulina shared a number of photos of herself in which she and Ric raised their sons Jonathan (27) and Oliver (22)

It started on Friday and crept up on me like a very stealthy cat sneaking up on its prey. While I thought a good night’s sleep would make it go away – I woke up on Saturday with a complete lack of interest in anything. Including getting up.

“For me this is the third day that I feel like my bones are made of lead pipes.”

She later documented her search for a rental apartment and revealed that she wished she could buy a new place.

Paulina and Ric were married for three decades before silently parting in 2017, but they hadn’t finalized their divorce when he passed away last year.

Before his death, Ric cut his estranged wife out of his will and claimed that she had “abandoned” him, but because they were not legally divorced, Paulina, as his widow under New York law, may be entitled to an “electoral share” of his estate.

Ric explicitly referred to the rule in his will and stated: “Even if I should die before our divorce is final … Paulina is not entitled to a share of the vote … because she has left me.”

Unless she can be shown to have left him in court, she is likely to be entitled to a third of the musician’s assets, which are listed as $ 5 million in “copyrights”, $ 100,000 in “tangible personal property” is. and $ 15,000 in cash.

Ready to go: The mother of two, who moved out of townhouses, admitted that she had never cried more than last year

Ready to go: The mother of two, who moved out of townhouses, admitted that she had never cried more than last year

Difficult to handle: Paulina, who was last pictured in her house in October, struggled with depression and anxiety

Difficult to handle: Paulina, who was last pictured in her house in October, struggled with depression and anxiety

Paulina has been incredibly open about her anger and grief in her social media posts since her husband’s death.

Last week she shared some of the gruesome comments she had received from online trolls who told her to get a life and stop whining after reading up on their struggles after Ric’s death.

She intended to post the comments as a joke, but stated in the caption that the riots in the U.S. Capitol caused her to see the hateful messages differently.

“What should you post on a day like this? That’s what I planned: Some “thoughtful readers email” as a comedy break … but now when I look at it, I see it very differently. I wonder if my “thoughtful” readers are the same people who cracked down on democracy yesterday, “she wrote.

“The disenfranchised, the bitter, the disappointed, the uninformed, the frightened: people who basically hurt their skin and have no idea how to stop.”

The comments seem to be responses to her Instagram posts about her grief, battles with depression and anxiety, and anger after learning that The Cars frontman cut her out of his will.

Unnecessary Cruelty: Last week Paulina shared a handful of comments she had received from online trolls telling her to stop whining and get a life.

Unnecessary Cruelty: Last week Paulina shared a handful of comments she had received from online trolls telling her to stop whining and get a life.

Lack of empathy: The comments seem to be responses to her Instagram posts about her grief, mental health struggles, and anger after the death of her late husband Ric

Lack of empathy: The comments seem to be responses to her Instagram posts about her grief, mental health struggles, and anger after the death of her late husband Ric

“I’m sick of this guy … t … stop whining … f-off and grow a couple,” wrote one person while another commented. ‘TAKE A DIFFERENT KEY AND STFU! God bless Ric OCASEK. What’s up, can’t you sell your a ** after the sauce train burns you? ‘

Others insulted her appearance, telling her that she “had not aged well” and that she looked “like an old lady”.

“Take yourself in hand … please!” one person advised. “You have to start over like millions of other women.”

In her response, Paulina pointed out that these people are all looking for love that they have not yet found.

“I don’t really have much sympathy for her – but I keep thinking about how much better the world would be if we all at least tried to understand each other better – and the only thing I can do is do this to do yourself. ” She wrote.

The cover star said she believed if she chose empathy, others would “choose the same thing”.

“While I don’t love killers and racists, bigots and hypocrites, etc., the list is long. It’s worth noting that these are also biodegradable containers that are looking for love.” You haven’t found it yet, “she explained.

Paulina ended her contribution by thanking writers Molly Jong-Fast and Annika von Holdt for their lessons [her] using the example of dealing with “thoughtful” readers’ mail.


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Interior Health creates new service for mental health and substance abuse – Okanagan

Inner health has made it easier for people to access their support for mental health and substance abuse in the community. The new phone number is easy to remember: 310-MHSU (6478).

The phone service was developed in response to public feedback as people asked for an easier way to access community support.

Telephone service is available to anyone in the Interior Health area.

The 310 MHSU phone service connects callers to Interior Health’s mental health services.

The health authority says the new phone service will not replace any existing numbers for mental health, acute or emergency services, or for “The Interior Crisis Line” (1-888-352-2273).

For those in need of psychological support and under the age of 19, visit B.C. Child and Adolescent Mental Health for Resources.

More information on MHSU services in Interior Health can be found here.




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Artist Alison Lapper’s son ‘driven to drink and drugs by bullies’

The teenage son of the disabled artist Alison Lapper had taken a cocktail with prescription drugs before his death.

Parys Lapper, who appeared on BBC1’s A Child of Our Time, had suffered from mental health problems for years.

The 19-year-old had been bullied and ill-treated at school for his mother’s disability and turned to alcohol and drugs to cope.

However, he became heavily addicted to drugs and dropped out of school when his life got out of hand.

He was treated by mental health services but was released on August 1, a few days before his death.

An investigation into his death found that the teen had taken several prescription drugs in addition to heroin in the hours before his death.

Parys Lapper, 19, (picture left) was found dead in a hotel room in Worthing. His mother, the disabled artist Alison Lapper (55) (pictured right), told an investigation that her son had failed the mental health services prior to his death

Artist Alison Lapper and partner Si Clift leave the West Sussex Coroners Court in Crawley today after investigating the death of their son Parys

Artist Alison Lapper and partner Si Clift leave the West Sussex Coroners Court in Crawley today after investigating the death of their son Parys

Miss Lapper, 55, an artist born with no arms or shortened legs due to an illness called Phocomelia, famously posed naked for a marble sculpture while pregnant with Parys. The sculpture by artist Marc Quinn was later exhibited on the fourth pedestal in Trafalgar Square between 2005 and 2007 (picture)

Miss Lapper, 55, an artist born with no arms or shortened legs due to an illness called Phocomelia, famously posed naked for a marble sculpture while pregnant with Parys. The sculpture by artist Marc Quinn was later exhibited on the fourth pedestal in Trafalgar Square between 2005 and 2007 (picture)

The hearing was told that Parys had been prescribed several drugs – including drugs to treat anxiety – from his GP and mental health team at Sussex Partnership NHS Trust.

But Parys was “desperate for drugs” and paid to be Dr. Richard Duffett – a private psychiatrist on Harley Street – who independently prescribed a potent anti-anxiety pill.

The investigation was told they were duplicates as Parys was already being prescribed the same drugs by his mental health team.

The investigation was told that he had misused the medication and taken a series of anti-anxiety pills at once.

The teenager was found dead from a drug overdose on August 13, 2019 at a hotel in Worthing, West Sussex.

Parys’ family believe the worried teenager had failed mental health services prior to his death, and his mother Alison previously informed the Crawley, West Sussex investigation that she had very serious concerns about his treatment.

She said bad decisions had been made and claimed that several important opportunities to help her son had been tragically missed.

In a statement she said: “Tragically, this should never have happened. I feel like Parys has been disappointed with social services and big changes are needed to prevent this from happening to any other child. ‘

Miss Lapper, 55, an artist born with no arms and shortened legs due to phocomelia, famously posed naked while pregnant with Parys for a marble sculpture.

The sculpture by artist Marc Quinn was later exhibited on the fourth pedestal in Trafalgar Square between 2005 and 2007.

Miss Lapper (left) previously shared how Parys was horribly bullied and ridiculed as a child. She told the Crawley investigation that her son (right) started smoking cannabis and drinking heavily as a coping mechanism

Miss Lapper (left) previously shared how Parys was horribly bullied and ridiculed as a child. She told the Crawley investigation that her son (right) started smoking cannabis and drinking heavily as a coping mechanism

Miss Lapper had previously told the investigation that Parys was a normal, happy boy who took care of his appearance and loved life.

However, by the time he entered his teenage years, his behavior started to deteriorate and he was less social and happy.

She said severe bullying he suffered at school left him suffering from anxiety and depression.

She told the investigation, as a coping mechanism, that her son started smoking cannabis and drinking a lot, and as this increased, he stopped washing and fending for himself.

The investigation found that his behavior deteriorated and he stopped going to school and interacting with friends.

The worried teen began to stay in bed all day and his weight dropped when he stopped eating normally and had panic attacks.

He has been diagnosed with a catalog of medical conditions, including depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and ADHD.

At the age of 17, Parys’ behavioral and mental health problems worsened and he was placed under the Mental Health Act at Worthing Hospital.

From there he was transferred to Chalkhill on Haywards Heath – a leading hospital for the treatment of children and adolescents with mental health problems – where he received a treatment program.

The hearing was told that he would then be transferred to a center for young people with behavioral problems in Bognor Regis.

Miss Lapper said she felt the placement was wrong as the main focus of the unit was on keeping the room clean, shopping and taking care of themselves.

However, Parys found it almost impossible to take care of himself, and his mother stepped in to help him.

Although he attended appointments with a psychiatrist, his condition continued to deteriorate.

Miss Lapper said to the hearing: “He had suicidal thoughts because nobody was listening to him.”

She said when Parys turned 18 she had no say in his medical treatment.

Miss Lapper said his behavior had become more and more erratic and she had been given packages of drugs at home that her son had ordered from the Internet.

Parys was found a place in a supported housing unit but then moved in with a man named Terry whom he met on the Craigslist website.

The teenager would tell people that Terry was his uncle, but the hearing was told that the couple had met on the website that linked people offering sexual favors for drugs.

Parys' family believe the worried teenager had failed mental health services prior to his death, and his mother Alison had previously advised the Crawley, West Sussex investigation that she had very serious concerns about his treatment

Parys’ family believe the worried teenager had failed mental health services prior to his death, and his mother Alison had previously advised the Crawley, West Sussex investigation that she had very serious concerns about his treatment

Miss Lapper said Parys kept asking her for money and asking her to put money into Terry’s bank account.

The investigation was told that when his NHS psychiatrist refused to give him the schizophrenia drugs he had requested, he found a private psychiatrist and started a course on various drugs.

Parys was released from mental health service on July 25, 2019 and was living in a temporary accommodation hotel in Worthing, West Sussex.

The teenager was found dead 18 days later at the Wolsey Hotel from an alleged accidental drug overdose.

His psychiatrist Dr. Arun Ravivarman, of Sussex Partnership NHS Trust, told the investigation he did not know if he would be alive if Parys had not been released.

The investigation continues.

For confidential support, call the Samaritans on 116 123 or visit a local Samaritan office or click here for details.


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Coronavirus: Quebec doctor’s death by suicide sends shockwaves through Canada’s medical community

The death of an emergency doctor in Granby, Que., Has caused shock waves across the Canadian medical community.

Dr. Karine Dion, 35, who was also the mother of a young son, died of suicide in early January. Her family said it was the stress of the COVID-19 pandemic that resulted in her death.

“Her family and husband went public with this death to educate the public of the immense hardship health workers are experiencing on the front lines of this pandemic,” said Dr. Naheed Dosani, palliative care practitioner and health equity activist.

“During this pandemic, our frontline health workers, my colleagues, have experienced significant psychological stress, loss, trauma, grief, and a burden that is really difficult to put into words.”

The burnout rate of doctors practicing emergency medicine is estimated to be around 86 percent, according to a recent survey by the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians (CAEP), the national organization that represents emergency doctors across the country.

The same survey found that “Frontline workers will be affected by COVID-19 both during and after the pandemic”.

Around 14 percent of respondents had contemplated suicide during their careers in emergency medicine, and of those doctors nearly six percent had actively contemplated suicide in the past year.

“We know whenever there is stress from the additional pressure and the stress is lengthening. We have the feeling that there is a feeling of powerlessness and helplessness.” It increases or can increase the risk of psychological risk conditions, physical risk conditions and also burnout, ”explained Dr. Katy Kamkar, a Toronto-based clinical psychologist.

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Dosani said the pandemic had exponentially added pressure on healthcare workers.

“Working in the health care sector at the start of college is a very stressful thing and experience for people who have stress, this mental agony, it has doubled, it has tripled, it has grown exponentially,” he said.

“There is so much that health workers see and experience and this creates a sense of loss and sadness that many of us have never experienced before.”

Dosani also said that “grief circles” are more common for himself and his team.

“Our circles of grief have doubled, we have more than ever because more people are sick and more people are dying than ever before,” he said.

“For many people, it is the first time that people actually had space to just talk. With all of the talk about improving people’s health and health care, we spend very little time supporting our own on mental health and resilience and wellbeing. “

Dosani said the gatherings were an answer to that, but he feared they would “just scratch the surface”.

He explained that a “circle of mourning” is for the health team caring for a deceased patient or after a traumatic event, to take a break, perhaps light a candle, and reflect.

During the pandemic, the team can meet virtually.

Dosani said if the mental health of frontline workers is not prioritized now, “We will not beat COVID-19.”

“Our health workers will experience more psychological distress, more grief, more loss, more trauma, and this will place them in a situation where they cannot better serve our communities.” And we don’t want to go through this broken, more broken than we already are, ”he said.

Dr. Doris Grinspun, CEO of the Registered Nurses’ Association of Ontario (RNAO), said the problem of grief and mental health support isn’t just relevant to emergency medical services.

“Every time I think of my colleagues at the front … it scares me, it scares me,” she said.

“Hold on, doctors, nurses, rescue workers, anyone in essential service, including teachers, hold on.

“Remember, one in five people has mental illness (and) nurses, doctors, PSWs are no different.”

A friend of Dion’s started a GoFundMe campaign to raise money for her son Jacob. More than $ 29,000 was raised early Tuesday.

Donations can also be made to the Canadian Mental Health Association.

If you or someone you know is in crisis and needs help, resources are available. In an emergency, please call 911 for immediate assistance.

For a directory of support services in your area, see Canadian Association for Suicide Prevention.

Learn more about how you can help someone in crisis Here.

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Meditation can improve mental health and wellbeing but exercise may be just as effective 

While “mindfulness” was once a term known only to dedicated yoga fans, the form of meditation has grown in popularity in recent years.

Mindfulness involves sitting still and focusing on your thoughts in the present moment. It is said to help reduce anxiety, stress and depression.

Now, a study has warned that these mental health benefits may not work for everyone.

Cambridge University researchers say we shouldn’t assume that mindfulness works for everyone, emphasizing that exercise can be just as effective for some.

Cambridge University researchers say we shouldn’t assume mindfulness works for everyone, highlighting that exercise can be just as effective for some (stock image)

WHAT IS MINDFULNESS?

Mindfulness is a popular form of meditation where you focus on being aware of exactly what you are feeling and feeling in the moment.

The exercise includes breathing methods, guided imagery, and other exercises to help relax the mind and body and reduce stress.

It is often touted as a universal tool for increasing mental wellbeing by reducing stress, anxiety, and depression.

Mindfulness means sitting still and focusing on your thoughts, sounds, and sensations in the present moment.

It is often touted as a universal tool for increasing mental wellbeing by reducing stress, anxiety, and depression.

Randomized control studies (RCTs) have been conducted around the world to determine if this is the case. However, the results are different.

Now Cambridge University researchers have reviewed these studies to “make more robust conclusions”.

Dr. Julieta Galante said, “For the average person and those around them, it seems better to practice mindfulness than to do nothing to improve our mental health, especially when it comes to depression, anxiety and psychological distress.

“But we shouldn’t assume that it will work for everyone, everywhere.”

People often practice mindfulness in community settings such as universities, workplaces, or private courses.

The researchers identified 136 RCTs that looked at whether mindfulness in a community was beneficial for mental health.

Mindfulness means sitting still and focusing on your thoughts, sounds and sensations in the present moment (archive image)

Mindfulness means sitting still and focusing on your thoughts, sounds and sensations in the present moment (archive image)

These studies included 11,605 participants, ages 18 to 73, from 29 countries, of whom more than three-quarters (77 percent) were women.

The researchers found, in most cases, that mindfulness actually reduced anxiety, stress, and depression compared to doing nothing.

However, this did not work in more than one of 20 test settings.

Dr. Galante said, “Mindfulness training in the church needs to be done with care.

“Community mindfulness courses, among other things, should only be an option and the range of implications should be explored when courses are conducted in new settings.”

Or, it could be that meditation works best for people who are very excited to begin with.

In comparison to other wellbeing activities such as sport, mindfulness was not more effective, the researchers also found (archive image)

In comparison to other wellbeing activities such as sport, mindfulness was not more effective, the researchers also found (archive image)

WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF MEDITATION?

Meditation can last up to 5000 BC. Be traced back.

It is associated with some philosophies and religions but is increasingly being practiced as a secular, stress relieving activity.

A recent study found that meditation can reduce the risk of heart disease by reducing risk factors that can lead to the disease.

In particular, it found that the practices can lower blood pressure and reduce anxiety and depression.

It can also help people quit smoking, which can lead to a fatal heart attack.

Experts caution that healthy lifestyle changes such as physical activity are still the safest way to fight off the disease, but that meditation can also decrease the odds.

Dr. Galante said, “The courses that work best may be aimed at people who are the most stressed or in stressful situations, such as health workers, as they seem to see the greatest benefit.”

Compared to other wellbeing activities like exercise, mindfulness wasn’t more effective, the researchers also found.

Co-author Professor Peter Jones said, “While mindfulness is often better than doing nothing, we have found that there are other effective ways to improve our mental health and wellbeing, such as: B. Movement.

“In many cases, these may prove to be more appropriate alternatives if they are more effective, culturally acceptable, or practical, or cheaper to implement. The good news is that there are more options now. ‘

The number of mindfulness classes offered has increased significantly in recent years and especially since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Although the effectiveness of online courses has not yet been established, preliminary research suggests that they work despite the lack of direct contact.

Dr. Galante said, “When the effects of online mindfulness courses are as varied as offline courses in different environments, the lack of human support can create potential problems.

“We need more research before we can be confident about their effectiveness and safety.”

Other factors could be responsible for the different levels of success between settings, the researchers warn.

For example, where and by whom the courses are delivered, or to whom they are directed, is likely to have an impact.

Dr. Galante said, “The techniques and frameworks taught in mindfulness come from rich and diverse backgrounds, from early Buddhist psychology and meditation to cognitive neuroscience and participatory medicine.

“It is to be expected that the interplay of all these different factors will influence the effectiveness of a program.”

The results were published in the journal PLOS Medicine.


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