Coronation Street: Ken and Peter Barlow discuss mental health

Coronation Street viewers are in tears over the “heartbreaking” scene in which Ken Barlow tells his son Peter that he attempted suicide

  • For help and support call the Samaritans hotline 116123 or visit www.samaritans.org

Coronation Street fans were in tears after a heartbreaking scene in the Wednesday night episode in which Ken Barlow (William Roache) and son Peter (Chris Gascoyne) discussed their mental health issues.

In the segment that was lauded by viewers on social media, Peter told his father that he felt like he couldn’t go on living as he battled liver failure in the hospital after his alcoholism relapse.

Ken later revealed to his son that he had previously battled depression and tried to kill himself 30 years ago.

Heartbreaking: Coronation Street fans were in tears after a scene in the Wednesday night episode in which Ken Barlow and his son Peter discussed their mental health problems

He said, “You know I won’t let you give up.”

“Why do you always have to be so positive?” Peter then asked.

Ken replied, “I’ve had my lows too, you know there was a time when I didn’t want to go on, I wanted to end it.

‘New Year’s Eve 1990, thirty years ago today. I was a mess, I had lost everything, my business, my wife, and I knew it was all my fault, I had done it to myself. My affair with Wendy Crozier poisoned everything. ‘

Honestly: In this passage, Peter told his father (pictured) that he felt like he could not go on living as he battled liver failure in the hospital after his alcoholism relapse

Honestly: In this passage, Peter told his father (pictured) that he felt like he could not go on living as he battled liver failure in the hospital after his alcoholism relapse

Ken later told Peter that he had “a bottle of pills” and swallowed three before being stopped by Bet Gilroy (Julie Goodyear).

He continued, “I haven’t told anyone, I’ve never had to before.

“It was the lowest I’ve ever been. I was ashamed of who I was, how selfish and thoughtless I had been, really feeling sorry for myself. You know, if I did, if I gave up just think about all the wonderful things that I would have missed. ‘

Ken later recalled the memories he made and the people he had met in the 30 years following his suicide attempt, and admitted that it was “worth it all”.

Then he said, “The pain I felt then is nothing compared to the joy I have had since then.

Candid: Ken later revealed to his son that he had previously battled depression and tried to kill himself 30 years ago

Candid: Ken later revealed to his son that he had previously battled depression and tried to kill himself 30 years ago

Hopeful: Ken told Peter that he believed things would get better for him

Hopeful: Ken told Peter that he believed things would get better for him

“Peter, please believe me when I say that things are getting better and I believe that this illness will make you better.

“You could have 30 years left and meet your own grandchildren. Many good times ahead, don’t give up yet my son. ‘

On Twitter, viewers announced they were sobbing about the scene, which was also praised for their openness to mental health.

One tweeted, “I loved that scene with Ken and Peter, men talking about their sanity are so important to #corrie.”

Another added, “Ken and Peter’s heat to heart, I cry.”

A third wrote, “This Peter / Ken scene is heartbreaking … #Corrie.”

In tears: On Twitter, viewers revealed they were sobbing over the scene, which was also praised for their openness about mental health

In tears: On Twitter, viewers revealed they were sobbing over the scene, which was also praised for their openness about mental health

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Mother, 34, who survived crash that killed three of her friends dies after drug battle

The 34-year-old mother, who became addicted to heroin while trying to be the sole survivor of a car accident that killed three friends, died of sepsis caused by her drug use

  • Stacey Haslam was the only survivor of a crash that killed three of her friends
  • The “wonderful” 34-year-old from Bolton could not overcome a drug addiction
  • She died of sepsis after prolonged heroin use caused an abscess on her leg
  • According to Coroner, the life of the mother of two was ruined by her lifestyle after the 2011 crash

A mother who became addicted to heroin after struggling to be the sole survivor of a car accident that killed three of her friends died of sepsis caused by long-term drug use.

The mother of two, Stacey Haslam, 34, suffered serious injuries when her friend’s car hit a lamp post and overturned on the A666 in Darwen, Lancashire in October 2011.

A coroner heard that the crash had a long-term impact on Stacey’s life when she became addicted to cocaine and heroin.

In July of that year she was admitted to the Royal Bolton Hospital with a leg abscess, believed to be the result of prolonged heroin abuse.

She died three days later after developing sepsis.

Coroner Alan Walsh described Stacey as a “good mother” whose “life was ruined by her lifestyle.”

Stacey Haslam, 34, has died nine years after a terrible accident that killed three of her friends. The life of the mother of two has been “destroyed” by her lifestyle, a coroner said after hearing that she was unable to beat heroin addiction and crack cocaine after the crash

Helen Openshaw (38) died in 2011 at the site of the terrible crash, while Roy O’Brien (33) and Lee Amos (39) died in hospital shortly afterwards.

Stacey’s mother, Mandy Haslam, had told the coroner’s court how her daughter struggled with addiction and depression after the tragic death.

She said her daughter complained of contact leg pain on July 4, but initially refused to go to the hospital.

Stacey was finally admitted on July 6th and suffered from leg swelling and symptoms of sepsis.

Paul Harris, a consultant surgeon at Royal Bolton Hospital, said staff tried to treat the infection with antibiotics and needed repeated resuscitation.

However, Stacey gradually became unresponsive to treatment before suffering from multiple organ failures.

She was pronounced dead in hospital on July 9th.

An autopsy revealed that her death was caused by septicemia caused by an abscess in her leg, which was due to repeated injections of medication.

The investigation found that Stacey had been sent to Bolton’s Drug and Alcohol Recovery Service ACHIEVE but was unable to overcome her addiction.

The Bolton Coroner Court recorded a drug-related death conclusion in the case of Stacey Haslam, who had a 17-year-old son and a 13-year-old daughter

The Bolton Coroner Court recorded a drug-related death conclusion in the case of Stacey Haslam, who had a 17-year-old son and a 13-year-old daughter

Ms. Haslam said her daughter was “wonderful” and would be missed by her 17-year-old son and her own 13-year-old daughter

But she said Stacey struggled to cope with the aftermath of her actions and was unable to change her lifestyle after the fatal crash.

In his conclusion, the coroner said: “She was a young woman with children who, according to her family, had been a good daughter, a good mother and someone whose life had been ruined by her lifestyle.

“It had developed after a very serious road collision when she suffered very serious injuries and was the only survivor.”

He recorded a conclusion about drug-related death.

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Calls for fresh approach from Saskatchewan’s first addictions, mental health minister

Lawyers point out potential priorities for Saskatchewan’s first minister for addiction and mental health.

Swift Current MLA Everett Hindley won the title in November – an addition to the portfolio for rural and remote health and seniors.

“It shows how important this area is to our government,” Hindley said in an interview with Global News last month.

“It is a subject that we will be very focused on in the future.”

While Hindley said he doesn’t have a specific to-do list yet, addiction and psychiatrists have highlighted a few priority areas.

Response to addiction crisis

The first step is fundamental: keep people alive.

Overdose deaths have skyrocketed in Saskatchewan, more than quadrupling since 2010. As of December 1, the Saskatchewan coroner had recorded 122 confirmed and 201 suspected deaths from overdose.

Vidya Reddy, an education specialist with AIDS programs in South Saskatchewan, said the department should cut those statistics.

“It’s a completely preventable cause of death,” said Reddy.

“Curbing addiction and substance use is much more of a challenge, but we can definitely, definitely … reverse the overdose crisis.”

Reddy nodded to the provincial naloxone distribution program, but said overdose prevention agencies (OPS) were the best way forward.

OPS are like temporary, less sophisticated Monitored Consumption Points (SCS) that can be set up quickly, Reddy said.

He said they need to be set up across the province as a stopgap solution to the crisis.

“Then we can give the people who are dealing with the challenges of addiction a fair chance to overcome them,” Reddy said.

In the last provincial budget, the government refused to fund the only SCS in Saskatoon. The sites have been shown to save lives and connect people with appropriate treatment, according to Health Canada.

Local advocates have expressed frustration that the government will not invest in the evidence-based strategy despite claiming that responding to addiction problems is a priority.

“We have to look at all the different options that are out there,” said Hindley.

“I look forward to hearing more information about this and that will help us make our future decisions, but yes, I can understand the confusion.”

Mental health crisis prevention

The head of the Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA) in Saskatoon hopes the province will move to a preventive approach.

“This move to identify mental health as part of a ministerial responsibility hopefully signals some investment in our community mental health system.” said Faith Bodnar, general manager of CMHA Saskatoon.

“We need to look at all parts of the mental health system and support in our community and put the clock back on so we can be proactive.”

Bodnar said emergency response measures are crucial for those struggling with addiction, mental illness, or both, but the province needs support before people get into crisis.

“Just having more beds won’t solve the whole problem,” she said, highlighting long waits for treatment.

Education, solid income support and affordable housing are important building blocks for well-being, said Bodnar.

“We need to look at housing as a primary way to help people stabilize their lives,” she said.

“Many people with mental illness and mental health needs live in very precarious, unstable and often very unsafe homes.”

“The government is there to support”

Both Bodnar and Reddy praised the province for focusing on addiction and mental illness.

Hindley said he has started consulting with stakeholders and is keen to take their advice.

“They are the ones doing all the heavy lifting and the government is there to support that as much as possible,” he said.

He noted that the province invested a record $ 435 million in responding to mental health and addiction in its latest budget.

“That being said, we know there is more work to be done as there are still very disheartening stories at times,” he said.

“I think you will see that this will continue to be an important source of investment for the government ahead of the provincial budget next spring.”




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Victims of racism should take Ecstasy or magic mushrooms to reduce trauma, study suggests

Racism victims should take ecstasy or magic mushrooms to lessen the trauma of their experience, suggests a new study.

Scientists found that a single psychedelic trip from mushrooms, acid, or MDMA could help victims overcome the racism they were exposed to.

Psychedelics could also help reduce stress, depression and anxiety in black, indigenous and colored people, whose encounter with racism was found to have caused permanent damage.

In the new study, participants reported that their trauma-related symptoms related to racist acts were reduced in the 30 days after experiencing psilocybin, also known as magic mushrooms, LSD, or MDMA, also known as ecstasy.

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Scientists found that a single psychedelic trip from mushrooms, acid, or MDMA could help victims overcome the racism they were exposed to

“Their experience with psychedelics was so strong that they could remember and report on changes in symptoms from racial trauma that they had experienced in their lives,” said research co-lead author Dr. Alan Davis, an assistant professor at Ohio State University in the US.

“And they remembered that after that, their mental health problems had decreased significantly.”

The more intensely spiritual and insightful the psychedelic journey, the more significant the recalled decrease in trauma-related symptoms was, as the results show.

Growing research suggests that psychedelics have a place in therapy, especially when administered in a controlled environment.

Dr. Davis said, “What previous research on mental health in general has lacked is a focus on people with skin color and treatments that might specifically address the trauma of chronic exposure to racism.”

Co-lead study author Dr. Monnica Williams of the University of Ottawa in Canada said the results show that psychedelics can be important in healing.

She said, “There are currently no empirically supported treatments specifically for racial trauma.

“This study shows that psychedelics can be an important path to healing.”

A growing body of research has shown that psychedelics like psilocybin mushrooms have a place in therapy

A growing body of research has shown that psychedelics like psilocybin mushrooms have a place in therapy

The researchers recruited participants in the United States and Canada using Qualtrics survey research panels.

They selected a sample of 313 people who said they had previously taken a dose of a psychedelic that they believed helped “alleviate the challenging effects of racial discrimination.”

The sample included adults identified as black, Asian, Hispanic, Native American, or indigenous Canadian, Hawaiian, and Pacific islanders.

Upon enrollment, participants completed questionnaires collecting information about their previous experiences with racial trauma, psychedelic use, and mental health symptoms.

You have been asked to recall an unforgettable psychedelic experience and its short-term and longer-term effects.

These had only occurred a few months before the study and at least ten years earlier.

Dr. Williams said, “The discrimination they encountered included unfair treatment by neighbors, teachers and bosses, false accusations of unethical behavior and physical violence.

“The most common problems reported were feelings of intense anger about being exposed to a racist act and trying to” scold “someone for racist behavior but say nothing instead.”

The researchers asked participants to remember the severity of symptoms of anxiety, depression, and stress associated with exposure to racial injustice in the 30 days before and after using psychedelics.

Given the likelihood that racism is a lifelong problem rather than a single event, the researchers also assessed whether people suffered from discriminatory post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Dr. Davis, who is also an associate faculty member at the Johns Hopkins University Center for Psychedelic and Consciousness Studies, said, “Not everyone experiences racial trauma in all forms.

“But people of color certainly experience many of these different types of discrimination on a regular basis.

“In addition to depression and anxiety, we asked if the participants had symptoms of race-related PTSD.”

Participants were also asked to share the intensity of three common types of experiences people have had while under the influence of psychedelics – mystical, insightful, or challenging.

Dr. Davis added, “A mystical experience can feel like a spiritual connection to the divine. An insightful experience increases people’s awareness and understanding of themselves.

“And a challenging experience relates to emotional and physical responses such as anxiety or difficulty breathing.”

Participants in the study completed questionnaires and gathered information about their previous experiences with racial trauma, psychedelic use, and psychological symptoms

Participants in the study completed questionnaires and gathered information about their previous experiences with racial trauma, psychedelic use, and psychological symptoms

All participants remembered their symptoms of anxiety, depression, and stress after the memorable psychedelic experience was less than before the drug use.

The extent of the positive effects of the psychedelics influenced their reduction in symptoms.

Dr. Davis said, “This analysis has shown that a more intense mystical and insightful experience, as well as a less intense challenging experience, are related to mental health benefits.”

The researchers found that the study had limitations because the results were based on recall from participants and the entire sample of recruited volunteers reported benefits they associated with their psychedelic experience.

This means that psychedelics cannot be assumed to help all people of color with racial trauma.

Researchers are currently working on proposals for clinical trials to further examine the effects of psychedelics on mental health symptoms in certain populations, including blacks, indigenous peoples, and blacks.

Dr. Davis added, “This was really the first step in examining whether people of color benefit from psychedelics, and in particular to examine a relevant trait of their mental health, namely their experience of racial trauma.

“This study helps start that conversation with this emerging treatment paradigm.”

The results were published online by the journal Drugs: Education, Prevention and Policy.

Half of the depression patients who were given only TWO doses of magic mushroom compound were symptom-free a month later

According to a new small study, ingesting just two doses of a compound found in magic mushrooms can reduce feelings of depression.

The researchers found that two-thirds of patients saw a 71 percent reduction in symptoms such as sadness, pessimism, and self-criticality.

In addition, four weeks after treatment, more than half of the participants were classified as remitted, meaning they were no longer classified as depressed.

The Johns Hopkins Medicine team says the results provide evidence that magic mushrooms could be a treatment for mental health problems and even help drive legalization of the drug.

A study by Johns Hopkins Medicine found that half of depression patients who took two doses of psilocybin compound found in magic mushrooms (above) were considered to be in remission

A study by Johns Hopkins Medicine found that half of depression patients who took two doses of psilocybin compound found in magic mushrooms (above) were considered to be in remission

In a 2016 study, the team found that psilocybin relieved anxiety and depression in people with life-threatening cancer diagnoses.

They say these results suggest the compound could be effective in a much larger population of patients.

“The magnitude of the effect we saw was about four times greater than what clinical studies have shown for traditional antidepressants on the market,” said Dr. Alan Davis, an Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

“Since most other depression treatments take weeks or months to complete and can have undesirable effects, this could mean a change if these results are sustained in future gold-standard placebo-controlled clinical trials.”


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COVID-19 pandemic nearly triples depression and anxiety in new moms: study

Being a new parent is difficult in the best of times, but when you factor in isolation amid a global pandemic, experts say it affects mental health.

“New parents are facing many challenges right now,” said Sara Beckel, Perinatal Health Coordinator for the Regina Perinatal Health Network.

“New parents just don’t get the support of other parents and that ‘me too’ part of parenting when they’re all up at 2:00 am and feeding all these babies. That solidarity with the parents is missing.”

Beckel offers social support to new and expectant parents who she said are highly isolated.

A recent study on Frontiers in Global Women’s Health shows that 29 percent of young mothers had symptoms of anxiety and 15 percent had symptoms of depression before the pandemic.

However, during the pandemic, those numbers nearly tripled. 72 percent of young mothers reported symptoms of anxiety and 41 percent reported depression.

“It’s a number that should be alarming,” Beckel said.

“We know that untreated mental health complications have a direct impact on early childhood development. We are trying to fill this gap and raise awareness about it.”

When new mom, Cynthia Sanders, found out last August that she was pregnant with her son Malcolm, she was thrilled.

“We had tried for so long and I had a vision of how I would spend my mat vacation and what I would do. I had visions of travel and brunch from mothers, ”said Sanders.

Fast forward a few months later and Sanders would encounter obstacles she had never imagined.

Not only was little Malcolm born 11 weeks premature, but a global pandemic would force the new mother into isolation.

“It’s lonely and it’s hard and as a young mom everyone says it’s hard but this is just an extra shift,” said Sanders.

Sanders is also listed as high risk from having a kidney transplant, and she said it was just too risky to go anywhere.

“I worry if something happens to me that I couldn’t take care of (Malcolm),” Sanders said.

“I think there is a little bit of fear you know more worried when I bring something home or when my husband brings something home.”

Beckel said group groups online and taking lots of photos can help bring a sense of normalcy into everyday life.

“Take lots of pictures, dress up and do the things you normally would, and find a way to do it in creative new ways because that’s what you want later,” Beckel said.

“Make the connections as best you can, and especially if you think things are very difficult and don’t make sense, keep a journal in a journal. It’s always good to keep a journal.”

Although Sanders said she has a lot of pictures, it is help that she misses most and the Malcolm family has yet to meet.

“When they say it takes a village to raise a child, it’s true and we did and he’s still here, but I think that’s something for the parents that we missed out on,” Sanders said .

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